Enclosures

  • Africa needs more data centres

    Every day people around the world generate 500 million tweets, post 4.3 billion Facebook messages and make 6 billion Google searches.  And these numbers are growing, driven not least by Africa’s relatively young population which, in the last 18 months, has seen a huge 47% increase in active mobile social users, Sybrand Pretorius explains.

  • Branch in a Box simplifies computing for the edge

    StorMagic has made available an integrated computing solution, which it has named Branch in a Box and operates as an integrated micro data centre solution designed specifically for hyperconverged and edge computing environments. The new system is a ready-to-deploy bundle that includes hardware from APC by Schneider Electric and Dell/EMC, with the virtualisation software needed to power, process and store mission-critical information. 

  • Data centre keeps its cool

    Ambient cooling and plenty of low-carbon hydro power is making the Arctic a viable site for data centres. Alan Beresford explains how EcoCooling is taking advantage of the climate at the award winning Hydro66 data centre in Boden, Sweden

  • Enhanced energy-efficiency with Power over Ethernet

    Regulators and other stakeholders are calling for data centres to use energy in the most efficient way. Power over Ethernet (PoE), which makes it possible to provide current to Ethernet devices using data cables already in place, can contribute to greater energy efficiency. It may even help structurally lower DC power consumption. However, several factors must be taken into consideration. Dr Thomas Wellinger, market manager data centres, R&M, explains

  • Flexenclosure to construct Fijian eCentre cable landing station

    The Fijian Government’s has commissioned Swedish Internet infrastructure specialist Flexenclosure for the construction of an eCentre cable landing station in Savusavu. As part of commitment to make high speed Internet services available on Vanua Levu, Fiji’s second largest island. The cable will connect to the Tui-Samoa undersea cable, providing a high-capacity and high-availability fibre optic link between Viti Levu, Fiji’s main island, and Vanua Levu. 

  • Hybrid power for Burkina Faso

    Flexenclosure, a Sweden-based designer and manufacturer of prefabricated data centre buildings and hybrid power systems for the ICT industry, has announced an order for more than 100 power systems, to be deployed across the West African nation of Burkina Faso.

  • Infrastructure solution shows all in Birmingham

    Visitors to this year’s Drives and Controls show will be able to see Rittal’s infrastructure solution on the company’s stand D720 along with some product innovations at next week’s show at the NEC. 

  • Installing switchgear the easy way

    Manufacturing switchgear can be very labour intensive and despite advances in automation, there is still a huge amount of manual work involved in cutting and machining busbars, support rails and cable ducts. Rittal Automation Systems is now offering new and improved machines and tools that will help automate or part-automate these previously time-consuming activities.

  • Laser machining centre will revolutionise control panel production

    Claiming a UK first, Runcorn and Ewloe-based electrical engineering firm, LCA Controls, has switched its control panel operations from manual production to laser-machining.  The move is expected to transform its productivity and efficiency.

  • Meeting the requirements of innovative IoT solutions

    Companies employing machine-to-machine communication to streamline manufacturing require real-time capabilities. And having IT resources deployed in close geographical proximity to the plant ensure that latency is low and data is readily available. 

  • Micro data centre offers direct liquid-to-chip cooling for high density applications

    Stulz has just launched a micro data centre which can be configured with all the key design aspects of a bricks and mortar model, including critical power control and monitoring, fire suppression, physical security and precision cooling.  The company suggests that this micro data centre will especially suit low to high density applications.

  • Navigating the data centre maze

    The International Data Corporation (IDC) recently reported that 73 per cent of companies now foresee the need for major modernisation of data centres, to keep pace with the speed of digital advances.  They include Industry 4.0, the Internet of Things, big data and edge computing.

  • Rittal to participate in London event

    Rittal is planning to exhibit and speak at the forthcoming DatacenterDynamics Converged Europe Conference and Expo being held in November at Old Billingsgate, London. The company says it will be showcasing its range of solutions that address the needs of companies who design, install and operate data centres, whatever their size or scale. These solutions are designed to provide users with efficient, flexible and scalable responses to meet the challenges their customers may face in the future.

  • Summer sun or Winter snow, these machine just want to go

    In summer, most us look forward to longer days, holidaying abroad and eating endless amounts of ice cream without feeling guilty. However, spare a thought for plant managers, who fill with dread when the temperature gage begins to increase. Here Jonathan Wilkins, marketing director at obsolete industrial parts supplier, EU Automation explains how plant managers can keep electrical enclosures running efficiently during the summer months.

  • Swinghandle system suits cabinets large or small

    Hardware manufacturer EMKA has claimed that its 1150 program of industrial swinghandles is the most comprehensive in the company's range. With IP ratings of IP40, IP54, IP65 and IP66, these rugged locking handles offer the OEM panel builder a complete package from the 80 and 120mm versions for enclosures through to the main range of 160mm and 200+mm handles for round or flat rods on large cabinets.

  • The data centre opportunity for cable landing stations

    The first ever submarine cable – laid in the English Channel in 1851 – heralded a new era of communication. And nearly 170 years later the world’s oceans are now crisscrossed by hundreds of thousands of kilometres of cable – long enough to get to the moon and back, and with plenty to spare, Shalini Lagrutta reports.